If you are facing charges under the Cannabis Control Act, it is important to understand your rights and legal options. The consequences for a conviction can be severe, including fines, jail time, and a criminal record. However, with the right defence strategy, it is possible to challenge the prosecution’s case and fight for a better outcome.

Understanding the Cannabis Control Act

The Cannabis Control Act is a state law that regulates the possession, sale, and use of marijuana. It classifies marijuana as a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning that it is considered to have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use. The law also sets out penalties for violations, including fines, imprisonment, and forfeiture of assets.

While the use of marijuana for medical purposes has been legalized in several states, the federal government still classifies it as a Schedule I controlled substance. This has created a legal gray area for those who use marijuana for medical purposes, as they may still face legal consequences under state law.

Key Provisions of the Act

The Cannabis Control Act contains several key provisions that are important to understand if you are facing charges. These include:

  • Prohibitions on possession, sale, transportation, and cultivation of marijuana
  • Penalties for violations, including fines and imprisonment
  • Exceptions for medical use of marijuana by registered patients
  • The definition of “readily available” and the enhanced penalties for violations

It is important to note that the penalties for violating the Cannabis Control Act can vary depending on the specific circumstances of the case. For example, if you are found to be in possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute, you may face more severe penalties than if you were found with a small amount of marijuana for personal use.

The Definition of “Readily Available”

One of the most important provisions of the Cannabis Control Act is the definition of “readily available.” Under the law, “readily available” means that the marijuana was in plain view, in an open container, or within reach of the driver or passengers in a vehicle. If you are charged with possessing marijuana that is “readily available,” you may face enhanced penalties, including longer jail sentences and higher fines.

It is important to note that the definition of “readily available” can be somewhat subjective, and there may be room for interpretation depending on the specific circumstances of the case. For example, if you are pulled over and a police officer sees a small amount of marijuana on the passenger seat of your car, it may be argued that the marijuana was not “readily available” since it was not within reach of the driver or passengers.

Penalties and Consequences

The penalties for violating the Cannabis Control Act can be severe. For example, possession of marijuana can result in up to one year in jail and a fine of up to $2,500 for a first offence. The penalties increase for subsequent offences and for violations involving larger quantities of marijuana. In addition to the legal consequences, a conviction for a drug offence can have long-term consequences for employment, housing, and other aspects of your life.

It is also worth noting that the legalization of marijuana for recreational use in some states has not eliminated the potential for legal consequences. While it may be legal to possess and use marijuana in certain circumstances, there are still restrictions and regulations in place that must be followed. Violating these regulations can still result in legal consequences, even in states where recreational marijuana use is legal.

Building a Strong Defense Strategy

If you have been charged under the Cannabis Control Act, it is important to hire an experienced lawyer who can help you build a strong defence strategy. Being charged with a crime can be a stressful and overwhelming experience, but with the right lawyer, you can feel confident in your defence.

Hiring an Experienced Attorney

An experienced criminal defence lawyer can help you understand your rights under the law and develop a strategy to challenge the prosecution’s case. They can provide you with guidance and support throughout the legal process, and work tirelessly to ensure that your rights are protected.

When choosing an lawyer, it is important to look for someone who has experience in defending clients against cannabis-related charges. They should have a thorough understanding of the Cannabis Control Act, as well as any other relevant laws and regulations.

Gathering Evidence and Witnesses

To build a strong defence, your lawyer may need to gather evidence and interview witnesses in support of your case. This may include obtaining medical records, conducting forensic testing, or interviewing experts in related fields.

It is important to work closely with your lawyer during this process, providing them with any information or documentation that may be relevant to your case. The more information they have, the better equipped they will be to build a strong defence on your behalf.

Challenging the Prosecution’s Case

Your defence lawyer will work to challenge the prosecution’s case by identifying weaknesses in the evidence and highlighting any procedural errors. For example, if the police conducted an unlawful search and seizure, your lawyer can argue that any evidence obtained as a result of that search should be suppressed.

They will also work to ensure that your rights are protected throughout the legal process, and that you are treated fairly and justly.

If you have been charged under the Cannabis Control Act, it is important to take action as soon as possible. Contact an experienced criminal defence lawyer today to discuss your case and begin building a strong defence strategy.

Common Defenses Against Cannabis Charges

Being charged with a cannabis-related offence can be a daunting experience. However, there are several common defences that can be used to challenge these charges. By understanding your legal options, you can work with your lawyer to build a strong defence strategy. Some of the most common defences include:

Unlawful Search and Seizure

One of the most powerful defences against cannabis charges is an unlawful search and seizure. The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution protects citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures. If the police conducted an unlawful search and seizure, any evidence obtained as a result of that search may be inadmissible in court. This can be a powerful defence strategy, as it can eliminate much of the evidence against you. For example, if the police did not have a warrant or probable cause to search your vehicle or home, any cannabis found during that search may not be admissible in court.

Entrapment

If you were induced to violate the Cannabis Control Act by a law enforcement officer, you may be able to argue entrapment as a defence. Entrapment occurs when the police induce someone to commit a crime that they would not have otherwise committed. This defence can be challenging to prove, as you must demonstrate that you were not predisposed to committing the crime and that the police induced you to do so. However, if you can prove entrapment, your charges may be dismissed.

Medical Necessity

If you are a registered medical marijuana patient, you may be able to argue that your possession or use of marijuana was for medical necessity. Many states have legalized medical marijuana for individuals with qualifying medical conditions. If you have a valid medical marijuana card and were using marijuana for a qualifying medical condition, you may be able to use medical necessity as a defence. This defence can be challenging, as you must demonstrate that your use of marijuana was necessary to treat your medical condition and that you were using it in accordance with state law.

Lack of Intent or Knowledge

If you did not know that marijuana was in your possession or believed that it was legal, you may be able to argue a lack of intent or knowledge as a defence. This defence is more commonly used in cases involving drug trafficking, but it can still be relevant in possession cases. For example, if you borrowed a friend’s backpack without knowing that it contained marijuana, you may be able to argue that you did not have the intent to possess marijuana. Similarly, if you believed that marijuana was legal in your state, you may be able to argue that you did not have the knowledge that your possession of marijuana was illegal.

It is important to remember that every case is unique, and there may be additional defences available depending on the specific circumstances of your case. By working with an experienced criminal defence lawyer, you can build a strong defence strategy and protect your rights in court.

Navigating the Legal Process

If you are facing charges under the Cannabis Control Act, it is important to understand the legal process and your rights under the law. The legal process can be a complex and daunting experience, but with the right knowledge and support, you can navigate it successfully.

When facing criminal charges, it is crucial to have a skilled and experienced defence lawyer on your side. Your lawyer can help guide you through the legal process and ensure that your rights are protected at every step.

Pre-Trial Motions and Hearings

One of the first steps your defence lawyer may take is to file pre-trial motions and attend hearings to challenge the prosecution’s case and seek to have evidence suppressed. These motions can be critical to protecting your rights and building a strong defence.

During pre-trial motions and hearings, your defence lawyer may argue that certain evidence was obtained illegally or that your constitutional rights were violated during the investigation. If the judge agrees, this evidence may be excluded from trial, which can significantly weaken the prosecution’s case against you.

Plea Bargaining

If the evidence against you is strong, your defence lawyer may engage in plea bargaining with the prosecution to seek a reduced charge or a lighter sentence. In some cases, a plea bargain may be the best option for achieving a favourable outcome.

Plea bargaining involves negotiating with the prosecution to reach a mutually acceptable agreement. This may involve pleading guilty to a lesser charge or agreeing to a reduced sentence in exchange for giving up your right to a trial.

Going to Trial

If plea bargaining is not an option or if you choose to fight the charges at trial, your defence lawyer will present your case before a judge or jury. At trial, the prosecution must prove their case beyond a reasonable doubt, and your defence lawyer will work to challenge the evidence and raise reasonable doubt wherever possible.

Going to trial can be a risky proposition, as the outcome is uncertain. However, if you have a strong defence and the prosecution’s case is weak, going to trial may be your best option for achieving a favourable outcome.

It is important to remember that the legal process can be lengthy and stressful, but with the right support and guidance, you can successfully navigate it. If you are facing charges under the Cannabis Control Act, it is crucial to seek the advice of a skilled and experienced defence lawyer as soon as possible.

Conclusion

Charges under the Cannabis Control Act can have serious consequences for your life and future. If you are facing charges, it is important to hire an experienced defence lawyer who can help you build a strong defence and fight for a better outcome. By understanding your legal options and working with a skilled lawyer, you can defend your rights and protect your future.

Contact Us Now

Your Local Lawyer is Harrison Jordan

Call Substance Law NOW – 647-371-0032

Harrison Jordan, Lawyer at Substance Law
Substance Law