Substance Law Logo
Over 100 5 star google reviews from Cannabis lawyer canada

Ontario Court of Justice Versus Superior Court of Justice: What Types of Cases Are Heard Where

Helping Canadian Businesses Get Licences, Stay Onside And Resolve Their Legal Challenges.

Ontario Court of Justice Versus Superior Court of Justice

The courts in Ontario serve to provide justice to all citizens of the province. The Ontario court system is made up of several courts that handle different types of cases. Two of the most essential courts in the Ontario court system are the Ontario Court of Justice and the Superior Court of Justice. Understanding the differences between these courts is crucial in understanding what types of cases are heard where.

Ontario Court of Justice Versus Superior Court of Justice

Understanding the Ontario Court System

The Ontario court system is an essential part of the Canadian legal system. It is responsible for interpreting and enforcing the laws of the province and ensuring that justice is served. The court system in Ontario is divided into several levels, each with its own set of responsibilities, to ensure that cases are handled efficiently and effectively.

It is important to understand the different levels of the Ontario court system to know which court to approach for legal matters. This knowledge can also help individuals prepare a case and have a better understanding of the legal process.

The Role of the Ontario Court of Justice

The Ontario Court of Justice is the first level of court in the Ontario court system. This court is responsible for hearing cases that are criminal, family law, or provincial offences in nature. It primarily handles cases that are considered to be less serious in nature and that do not require lengthy trials or extensive legal knowledge. The Ontario Court of Justice is also responsible for hearing cases involving youth offenders.

When it comes to criminal cases, the Ontario Court of Justice is responsible for hearing cases where the maximum penalty is less than two years in prison. This includes cases such as theft, assault, and drug possession. In family law cases, the Ontario Court of Justice is responsible for hearing cases such as child custody and access, child support, and spousal support. Finally, the Ontario Court of Justice is responsible for hearing cases that are considered to be provincial offences, such as traffic violations and bylaw infractions.

The Role of the Superior Court of Justice

The Superior Court of Justice is the higher court in the Ontario court system. It handles more serious civil and criminal cases, cases involving complex legal issues, and cases where the damages sought are higher. The Superior Court of Justice is also responsible for hearing appeals from lower courts.

When it comes to criminal cases, the Superior Court of Justice is responsible for hearing cases where the maximum penalty is more than two years in prison. This includes cases such as murder, manslaughter, and aggravated assault. In civil cases, the Superior Court of Justice is responsible for hearing cases such as personal injury claims, breach of contract, and defamation. The Superior Court of Justice is also responsible for hearing cases involving estates, bankruptcy, and commercial matters.

See also  What Should Be In The Organizational Resolutions of My Canadian Corporation?

The Importance of Jurisdiction in the Court System

One of the most important differences between the Ontario Court of Justice and the Superior Court of Justice is jurisdiction. Each court has its own set of jurisdictions, which means that certain types of cases can only be heard by specific courts. Understanding jurisdiction is crucial when it comes to deciding what type of court to approach for legal matters and how to prepare a case.

For example, if an individual wants to file for divorce, they would need to approach the Ontario Court of Justice since it has jurisdiction over family law cases. On the other hand, if an individual wants to file a personal injury claim, they would need to approach the Superior Court of Justice since it has jurisdiction over civil cases.

Overall, understanding the Ontario court system is crucial for anyone who needs to approach the courts for legal matters. Knowing the different levels of the court system and their respective jurisdictions can help individuals prepare a case and have a better understanding of the legal process.

Types of Cases Heard in the Ontario Court of Justice

The Ontario Court of Justice is an important legal institution in the province of Ontario, Canada. It is responsible for hearing a wide range of cases, from criminal offences to family law matters to provincial offences. In this article, we will explore the different types of cases heard in the Ontario Court of Justice.

Criminal Cases

One of the most common types of cases heard in the Ontario Court of Justice are criminal cases. Criminal cases involve offences that are considered illegal under Canadian law. These offences can range from minor infractions, such as theft under $5000, to more serious offences, such as assault causing bodily harm.

There are three types of criminal offences: summary conviction, indictable, and hybrid offences. Summary conviction offences are less serious and carry a maximum penalty of six months in jail and/or a $5000 fine. Indictable offences are more serious and carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. Hybrid offences can be tried as either summary conviction or indictable offences, depending on the circumstances.

The Ontario Court of Justice can hear summary conviction offences and some hybrid offences. However, indictable offences must be heard in the Superior Court of Justice.

Family Law Cases

Another important area of law that the Ontario Court of Justice deals with is family law. Family law cases involve legal disputes between family members, such as divorce, child custody, and child support. The Ontario Court of Justice is responsible for hearing family law cases that are related to child custody, access, and support. The court can also hear cases relating to spousal support, adoption, and child protection.

See also  What Are "Reasonable Steps" for Cannabis Promotions Under The Cannabis Act in Canada?

When it comes to family law cases, the Ontario Court of Justice encourages parties to try to reach a settlement agreement before going to trial. This is to avoid the emotional and financial costs of a trial. However, if a settlement cannot be reached, the court will hear the case and make a decision based on the evidence presented.

Provincial Offences

The Ontario Court of Justice also hears cases involving minor provincial offences that are set out in the Provincial Offences Act. These offences may include traffic tickets, bylaw offences, and environmental violations. Defendants have the option to plead guilty and pay a fine, or to contest the charges in court.

It is important to note that while these offences may be considered minor, they can still have serious consequences. For example, a traffic ticket can result in demerit points on your driver’s license, which can lead to higher insurance premiums. Therefore, it is important to take any provincial offence seriously and seek legal advice if necessary.

Youth Criminal Justice Cases

The final type of case that the Ontario Court of Justice hears is youth criminal justice cases. These cases involve individuals who are under the age of 18 and have been charged with a criminal offence or have breached a court order. The court’s objective when dealing with youth offenders is to encourage rehabilitation and reintegration into the community while still holding them accountable for their actions.

When it comes to youth criminal justice cases, the Ontario Court of Justice takes a different approach than it does with adult criminal cases. The court considers the age and maturity of the offender, as well as their background and circumstances, when making decisions about sentencing and rehabilitation.

In conclusion, the Ontario Court of Justice plays a vital role in the legal system of Ontario. It is responsible for hearing a wide range of cases, from criminal offences to family law matters to provincial offences. If you find yourself involved in a legal dispute, it is important to seek legal advice and understand your rights and options.

Types of Cases Heard in the Superior Court of Justice

Civil Cases

The Superior Court of Justice hears civil cases that involve disputes between individuals, businesses, or governments. The court hears cases where the amount in dispute is over $35,000 and cases that involve injunctive relief or declarations. The court can also hear cases involving class actions, judicial reviews, or constitutional challenges.

See also  Guide To Food Safety in Canada: HACCP, PCP and More...

Family Law Cases

The Superior Court of Justice is responsible for hearing family law cases that are complex or high-conflict. These cases may involve child custody, access, support, and property division. The court can also hear cases related to spousal support, adoption, or child protection.

Divisional Court Matters

The Divisional Court is a branch of the Superior Court of Justice that hears appeals from decisions of administrative tribunals or lower courts. These cases usually involve public law issues, such as labour relations, workers’ compensation, and human rights complaints.

Small Claims Court Cases

The Small Claims Court is a branch of the Superior Court of Justice that hears cases related to small amounts of money. The court can hear cases where the amount in dispute is less than $35,000. This court is less formal than other courts in the Ontario court system and does not require representation by a lawyer.

The Appeals Process in Ontario

Appealing Decisions from the Ontario Court of Justice

Decisions from the Ontario Court of Justice can be appealed to the Superior Court of Justice. However, appeals must be based on errors of law, fact, or mixed law and fact. The appeal process involves a review of the transcripts and evidence presented in the lower court, as well as an opportunity to present new evidence or arguments.

Appealing Decisions from the Superior Court of Justice

Decisions from the Superior Court of Justice can be appealed to the Court of Appeal for Ontario. Appeals must be based on errors of law or fact and require permission from the court. The appeal process involves a review of the transcripts and evidence presented in the lower court, as well as an opportunity to present new evidence or arguments.

The Role of the Court of Appeal for Ontario

The Court of Appeal for Ontario is the highest court in Ontario. The court hears appeals from the Superior Court of Justice and the Divisional Court. The court can also hear appeals from other provincial courts if they involve questions of law that affect the province as a whole or the country.

Conclusion

Understanding the Ontario court system and what types of cases are heard where is essential when it comes to navigating legal matters. The Ontario Court of Justice and the Superior Court of Justice have distinct jurisdictions and handle different types of cases. Knowing which court to approach for legal matters can make the difference between a positive and negative outcome. Although the court process can be complex, working with legal counsel can help streamline the process and increase the chances of success in court.

Get In Touch With Us Now

We Serve Those In The Following Industries… And More! Cannabis • Psychedelics • Vaping • Liquor • Tobacco • Excise Duty • Food & Drugs • NHPs • Money Services Businesses (MSBs), AML & FINTRAC • Crypto • NFTs.


Contact Our Law Practice Now

Book 30-Min Consultation

Book 60-Min Consultation


NOTE: May include referrals to vetted third party law firms, consultants, and other parties.

Please note we also retain the services of lawyers experienced in different areas on a contract basis.

Our Law Firm is Headed by Lawyer Harrison Jordan

Harrison Jordan, Lawyer at Substance Law